Ofsted Reports

Ofsted inspects and regulates to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. The new Ofsted brings together the wide experience of four inspectorates to make a greater difference for every child, and for all young people and adult learners, in England.

OFSTED REPORT SUMMARY 11.05.06

The quality and standards of the care are good. The registered person meets the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding. The quality and standards of the nursery education are good

Good = this aspect of the provision is Strong

Helping children to be healthy

The provision is good. Children are developing their understanding of the benefits of a healthy diet. They do not become thirsty as they confidently help themselves to water from the dispenser. Staff ensure babies have regular drinks. Children learn about healthy eating as they help prepare their daily snack of fruit. At sociable meal times children enjoy a healthy, well balanced diet which staff prepare on the premises.

Children begin to learn about being healthy as they regularly wash their hands, knowing why they have to do so. Staff minimise children’s exposure to germs and infections as they have good hygiene practices. For example, they wear gloves and aprons when changing nappies, regularly sweep the floor in the under two’s room and clean the tables before and after meals.
Distress to children following an accident is minimised as many staff have first aid qualifications.

Children enjoy a very well planned range of physical activities which contribute to their good health. Children have regular access to fresh air as good use is made of the garden. Regular outings to parks and the swimming pool enable children to develop their large muscle skills. Within the nursery children confidently use the climbing equipment, steer the ride on toys and buggies, dig in the soil and sand and use bats and balls. Daily activities which include cutting, drawing, threading, exploring seeds and shells and fitting puzzle pieces ensure children develop their small muscle skills.

Protecting children from harm or neglect and helping them stay safe

The provision is good. Children play in clean premises using toys, resources and equipment which are in good condition.

Children are cared for in premises where vigilant staff identify and minimise risks. This enables children to move freely and safely. For example, staff regularly practise the fire evacuation drill recording they have done this, a code on the gate prevents the children from opening it and staff close a door when they notice that a child is about to bump their head. Children learn about keeping safe as staff discuss why they must carry scissors in a certain way and children state why they have to put sun cream on.

Helping children achieve well and enjoy what they do

The provision is good. Children happily enter the setting and quickly settle to play. Friendly staff help the separation from carers as they warmly greet the children. Children and staff have very good relationships. Babies enjoy interacting with staff using gestures and smiles to indicate their feelings and needs. Older children are confident to approach staff for cuddles, conversation and support. Staff respond with interest and enthusiasm. Staff plan and provide a suitable range of activities for the under three’s which support their development. Babies and toddlers happily participate in these activities and receive good support from staff who sit with children and show interest in what they are doing.

Nursery Education

The quality of teaching and learning are good. Children make good progress supported by staff’s knowledge and understanding of the Foundation Stage. Written plans demonstrate that staff have a clear understanding of the curriculum guidance and provide suitable activities to cover all areas. Staff recognise when children are showing a particular interest in an activity and competently extend this. For example, when a child is sorting the various seeds and shells which are on the play dough table staff provide more resources. This enables the child to extend his activity while not disrupting the other children. Staff further support his learning as they discuss size and numbers. Children learn in a way which is meaningful and interesting to them. For example, when looking at life cycles children are able to watch cocoons change into butterflies as staff provide a butterfly house. Children confidently discuss what happens.

Staff use their knowledge and observation of children to plan the activities.

Children make good progress in all areas of learning. Children develop very good relationships with each other and work co-operatively. Children are very confident to speak individually and in group situations. Staff extend vocabulary as they use open ended questions and explain any new words to the group. Children are very competent when using writing materials and many children write recognisable letters. They understand that writing takes place for a variety of purposes as they have access to tickets, lists, leaflets and recipes. Children thoroughly enjoy listening to stories. Children understand that print carries meaning as staff point to the words when they read and children copy this. Children have competent mathematics skills. They are able to sort and match, name their shapes, discuss size, write some numerals and confidently count. Some children are developing their understanding of addition as they quickly say how many there will be if one more is added. Children have many opportunities to explore their natural environment as they use magnifying glasses to look for mini beasts, plant flower and vegetable seeds and watch them grow and care for the guinea pig. Children learn about everyday technology as they explore phones, cameras and cassette recorders. They have access to several clocks which helps them to learn about time. Children confidently use their imagination in free play and art activities. They regularly engage in detailed imaginative play with or without props. For example, in the home area the children pack up some food in a cloth and head to another area of the room to have picnic. During creative activities children happily design and construct using two and three dimensional materials. For example, they select material from the shelves and, using glue, make dog masks. They enjoy taking part in music sessions where they sing, join in with circle games and clap rhythms.

Helping children make a positive contribution

The provision is good. Children feel valued as staff are aware of individual needs and take time to support these. For example, staff follow the sleep and feeding routines of babies and toddlers home life. Children have access to a range of books, puzzles and posters which give children positive images of culture, gender and disability.

Children behave very well. Staff help children learn about good manners as they regularly say please and thank you to them. Children learn about acceptable behaviour as staff promote this.

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is fostered.

Partnership with parents is good. Effective links enable consistency in care as staff and parents regularly discuss children’s needs. The setting seeks the views of parents as they give them six monthly written questionnaires. They use this information to highlight areas to develop and gain parents views. For example, the setting is currently involving parents in the new menus they are planning. This enables parents to feel included in decisions about their child. The parent’s notice board gives parents clear information and they all receive a copy of the policies when their child starts. Parents whose children receive nursery education funding have good access to information about the six areas of learning. A topic sheet which is sent home, and is on display, informs parents of the activities. It gives examples of how children will learn as they play and enables parents to support their child’s learning at home. Staff discuss with parents their child’s development. Parents state they are happy with the setting commenting that the staff are very nice and they like the homeliness of the nursery.

Organisation

The organisation is good. Staff enhance children’s care with effective organisation. The staff team work very well together and consistent staff care for the children. For example, staff regularly work in both the rooms. This means the children know all the carers who work in the nursery.

All legally required documentation which contributes to children’s health, safety and well being is in place. The operational plan is clear and effective.

Leadership and management is good. Staff are led by an effective manager who communicates well with her team. She values her staff and includes them in discussions about nursery life. Effective recruitment procedures ensure that staff working with children are suitable to do so. Nearly all staff have childcare qualifications and staff who do not are currently on training programmes. The setting demonstrates it’s commitment to keeping up to date with current practice. Staff regularly attend training and seek information from professional publications. The manager oversees the planning to ensure it is covering all areas.

The setting meets the needs of the range of children for whom it provides.

Ofsted inspects and regulates to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. The new Ofsted brings together the wide experience of four inspectorates to make a greater difference for every child, and for all young people and adult learners, in England.

Sorry, this page is currently being updated, please check again soon for any updates or changes.

Ofsted inspects and regulates to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. The new Ofsted brings together the wide experience of four inspectorates to make a greater difference for every child, and for all young people and adult learners, in England.

Sorry, this page is currently being updated, please check again soon for any updates or changes.